about-us-img

History & General Information

For forty years Prevent Child Abuse America has engaged in work that is innovative and forward-thinking, as we look towards creating healthier, and happier, futures for children, their families and the country as whole.

Founded in 1972 by Donna J. Stone as the Family Achievement Center, we convened our first national conference on child abuse prevention in 1973. And while the name would change to the National Committee for the Prevention of Child Abuse in 1974 and ultimately Prevent Child Abuse America in 1999, the focus on cutting-edge work has continued throughout the organization’s history.

Our first state chapter was formed in Kansas in 1976, which is the same year we launched our first nationwide public service campaign on child abuse in partnership with the Advertising Council.

Initiating a dialogue about the issues that impact children and their families is who we are, and in 1984 we partnered with Marvel Comics to develop a Spider Man comic book focused on sexual abuse, the first in a series to help educate children on child abuse and neglect.

Of course, raising awareness is but part of the battle. There cannot be dialogue without data to support it, and with this in mind, we established the National Center on Child Abuse Prevention in 1986 and published the first annual 50-State Survey in 1987.

Further, to engage the public, but not offer solutions, is not what leading organizations do, and so in 1992 we launched the Healthy Families America initiative, which was followed by the first Healthy Families America national conference in 1994.

As the new Millennium dawned, Prevent Child Abuse America continued to expand its reach and vision. In 1999, and in partnership with the National Family Support Roundtable, the organization received federal funding to support the growth of a national network of parent self-help and mutual support programs which evolved into the Circle of Parents program.

This was followed that same year by a three-year grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to develop and launch a new public service advertising campaign in partnership with the Advertising Council

1999 also saw the release of a new report funded by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, which showed how the U.S. spent approximately $94 billion per year as a direct or indirect result of child abuse and neglect. This report on the economic update of child abuse and neglect was further updated, and refined, in 2007 and 2012, with funding from the PEW Charitable Foundation and MACY’s respectively.

In 2005 we received the first of two two-year BECAUSE Kids Count! grants from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention which were focused on the state of prevention across the country and how best to enhance the presence and impact of evidence-based programming.

In 2008 came a three-year grant in partnership with Purdue University and the National Indian Child Welfare Association from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency for the Tribal Youth Victimization and Delinquency Project.

And in 2011 a one-year grant from the Ms. Foundation to focus on preventing child sexual abuse, while expanding the impact of the ENOUGH Abuse campaign.

Along the way, we also launched Pinwheels for Prevention and more recently, served as co-founders of the National Movement for America’s Children, both efforts to redefine the national conversation about what prevention is and activate the public to recognize the roles they play, and might play, in preventing child abuse and neglect before it ever occurs.

Looking forward we have begun the development of a bullying prevention center, we continue to advocate for a national plan for the nation’s children, and intend to be at another forty years, or more, raising awareness, impacting policy, and activating the public to recognize that we all play a role in ensuring that all children have the opportunity to lead healthy, and happy, lives.

Find your local chapter

Got questions?
Use these resources
to find your statewide chapter.

us map-sm

Current news

Mayor Rahm Emanuel helps turn Chicago's Navy Pier into a Big Pinwheel Garden

 
Mayor Rahm Emanuel and 41st Ward Alderman Mary O'Connor to join Prevent Child Abuse America and its Illinois Chapter in turning Gateway Park at Navy Pier into Big Pinwheel Garden

Chicago event highlights month-long series of activities nationwide calling people to action in support of healthy starts for kids throughout April’s Child Abuse Prevention Month

APRIL 16, 2014 (Chicago, IL) – Mayor Rahm Emanuel and 41st Ward Alderman Mary O’Connor will join Prevent Child Abuse America and Prevent Child Abuse Illinois in turning Chicago’s Gateway Park at Navy Pier into a "Big Pinwheel Garden" on Wednesday, April 16, at 9:30 a.m. CT with hundreds of supporters creating a display of thousands of pinwheels – the national symbol for child abuse prevention. The event calls for people to take action in support of healthy child development as the nation marks April as Child Abuse Prevention Month. This event follows the April 8th Big Pinwheel Garden in Times Square and is one of many such events taking place nationwide throughout April as part of the Pinwheels for Prevention® campaign, through which Prevent Child Abuse America has distributed more than 3.5 million pinwheels nationwide since April 2008.

“We have a responsibility as a city to ensure that every single child in Chicago is able to grow up in a healthy, safe environment,” said Mayor Rahm Emanuel. “Chicago remains committed to preventing child abuse and neglect by increasing support services for families, including our efforts to expand domestic violence shelters for the first time in more than a decade. I am proud to stand with Prevent Child Abuse America and Prevent Child Abuse Illinois to observe Child Abuse Prevention Month and raise awareness for this important issue.”

Mayor Emanuel and Alderman O’Connor will be joined in speaking at the event by Prevent Child Abuse America President and CEO Jim Hmurovich and Prevent Child Abuse Illinois Executive Director Roy Harley.

“We’re here to reinforce the notion that all children deserve stable and happy childhoods, and that we all play a role in making this happen,” said Alderman O’Connor. “As a member of the City Council, one role I play is helping to make sure, along with Mayor and fellow City Council members, that policies and programs are in place that help create environments in which children can thrive. Together we can protect our children from bullying or sexual abuse, and together we can make sure that our children are nurtured and healthy.”

To support the campaign, the public can:

• Help a neighbor in need by offering to baby-sit or give parents a break
• Volunteer for your Prevent Child Abuse America state chapter or another child- or family- serving agency
• Donate at www.pinwheelsforprevention.org/give
• Donate $10 by texting PINWHEEL to 20222* (powered by www.givebycell.com)


“According to UNICEF, the U.S. ranks poorly in children’s issues, including being 32nd out of 34 industrialized nations in terms of child poverty and 26th out of 29 in terms of overall well-being. Realities like these should serve as a wake-up call and that we can and must do better,” said Jim Hmurovich, President & CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. “Pinwheel gardens are calls-to-action, some as simple as to provide the personal attention to families and children that each of us, from time to time, have needed ourselves. The pinwheels remind us that our nation does not have a national strategy to promote the healthy development of each child, regardless of their circumstances. This must change and our social norms as a nation must change from where we say we value children to all citizens playing an active role in children’s lives.”

“In Illinois,“ Roy Harley, Executive Director of Prevent Child Abuse Illinois pointed out, “our commitment along with all of our public and private sector partners, is that all children grow up in safe, healthy, nurturing environments free of abuse or endangerment of any kind. We know how to do this with effective family programs, early education, and community supports and we have to do this. We have to invest in children! A bright future for all of them is a bright future for all of us. Pinwheels say that every child matters and everyone needs to be involved.”

Prevent Child Abuse America state chapters’ pinwheels-focused events throughout April including a pinwheel garden event hosted by Nebraska’s First Lady in downtown Lincoln, NE; a “pinwheel garden” of 1,000 pinwheels in Indianapolis (each representing 87 healthy births for the 87,000 children born annually in Indiana); and pinwheel rallies at state capitals around the country.

 

Actor Josh Charles and Prevent Child Abuse America transform Times Square into Big Pinwheel Garden

 

Actor Josh Charles and Prevent Child Abuse America transform Times Square into Big Pinwheel Garden

Event promotes pinwheel as symbol for healthy starts for our nation’s children

APRIL 9, 2014 (NEW YORK, NY) – "The Good Wife" actor Josh Charles helped Prevent Child Abuse America transform Times Square into the Big Pinwheel Garden yesterday to mark Child Abuse Prevention Month and promote the pinwheel as the symbol for healthy starts for all children. Charles was joined by Manhattan magazine’s Cristina Cuomo and over 200 volunteers, holding nearly 5,000 pinwheels to create the display.

"I hope to be a father someday soon, and I feel strongly that living an innocent, care-free life isn't a right for just SOME children. It's the right for ALL children, regardless of the neighborhood they grow up in – or their socio-economic status," said Charles. "I care about the welfare of the next generation. Children are the artists, the politicians, the engineers, the doctors, the scientists of tomorrow, and I want to see ALL of them have the chance to lead full, productive, and safe lives."

The Times Square Big Pinwheel Garden is one of many such activities taking place across the country throughout April's Child Abuse Prevention Month, and is the signature event of the organization’s Pinwheels for Prevention® campaign, through which Prevent Child Abuse America has distributed more than 3.5 million pinwheels nationwide since April 2008.

“According to UNICEF, the U.S. ranks poorly in children’s issues, including being 32nd out of 34 industrialized nations in terms of child poverty and 26th out of 29 in terms of overall well-being. Realities like these should serve as a wake-up call and that we can and must do better,” said Jim Hmurovich, President & CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. “Pinwheel gardens are calls-to-action, some as simple as to provide the personal attention to families and children that each of us, from time to time, have needed ourselves. The pinwheels remind us that our nation does not have a national strategy to promote the healthy development of each child, regardless of their circumstances. This must change and our call to action must be to change our personal behavior, attitudes and social norms to value children; all children.”

To support Prevent Child Abuse America's efforts, the public can:

• Help a neighbor in need by offering to baby-sit or give parents a break
• Volunteer for your Prevent Child Abuse America state chapter or another child-serving agency
• Donate at www.pinwheelsforprevention.org/give
• Donate $10 by texting PINWHEEL to 20222* (powered by www.givebycell.com)

 

 

 

Prevent Child Abuse America teams with actor Josh Charles to turn Tims Square into Big Pinwheel Garden on April 8

 

Prevent Child Abuse America teams with actor Josh Charles to turn Times Square into Big Pinwheel Garden on April 8

NYC event headlines month-long series of activities nationwide calling people to action in support of healthy starts for kids throughout April's Child Abuse Prevention Month

APRIL 7, 2014 (NEW YORK, NY) – Prevent Child Abuse America and actor Josh Charles from the Emmy-nominated CBS show, The Good Wife, will turn New York City’s iconic Times Square into a "Big Pinwheel Garden" on Tuesday, April 8, at 9:00 a.m. ET with hundreds of supporters creating a display of more than 5,000 pinwheels – the national symbol for child abuse prevention. The event calls for people to take action in support of healthy child development as the nation marks April as Child Abuse Prevention Month. This will be the signature event of the Pinwheels for Prevention® campaign, through which Prevent Child Abuse America has distributed more than 3.5 million pinwheels nationwide since the campaign’s launch in April 2008.

“We all want healthy starts for our nation’s children; yet we know that various adversities like poverty, child abuse, domestic violence and substance abuse can sometimes get in the way,” said Charles. “But we can all play a role in taking the time to do what we can, to provide every child with the opportunity to have an even playing field as they start their lives. I’m a good example. I’m not a parent but hope to be in the future and very much want to see all children have the opportunity to lead full, productive lives.”

Charles will be joined at the event by Cristina Cuomo, Editor-in-Chief of Manhattan magazine, who will host the proceedings. Key organizational partners such as Manhattan magazine, Kappa Delta, Sigma Delta Tau and the General Federation of Women’s Clubs are lending support.

To support the campaign, the public can:

• Help a neighbor in need by offering to baby-sit or give parents a break
• Volunteer for your Prevent Child Abuse America state chapter or another child- or family- serving agency
• Donate at www.pinwheelsforprevention.org/give
• Donate $10 by texting PINWHEEL to 20222* (powered by www.givebycell.com)

“According to UNICEF, the U.S. ranks poorly in children’s issues, including being 32nd out of 34 industrialized nations in terms of child poverty and 26th out of 29 in terms of overall well-being. Realities like these should serve as a wake-up call and that we can and must do better,” said Jim Hmurovich, President & CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. “Pinwheel gardens are calls-to-action, some as simple as to provide the personal attention to families and children that each of us, from time to time, have needed ourselves. The pinwheels remind us that our nation does not have a national strategy to promote the healthy development of each child, regardless of their circumstances. This must change and our call to action must be to change our personal behavior, attitudes and social norms to value children; all children.”

In addition to the New York City event on Tuesday, April 8, the organization will host another Big Pinwheel Garden in Chicago on Wednesday, April 16, at Navy Pier, and Prevent Child Abuse America state chapters will conduct pinwheels-focused events throughout April, including a pinwheel garden event hosted by Nebraska’s First Lady in downtown Lincoln, NE; a “pinwheel garden” of 1,000 pinwheels in Indianapolis (each representing 87 healthy births for the 87,000 children born annually in Indiana); and pinwheel rallies at state capitals around the country.

 

 

 

Newsletter Sign-up

healthy families-icn
pinwheels-icn