STATEMENT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: BEN TANZER
(W): 312-663-3520 X823
(C): 312-806-4066

Embracing a Culture That Celebrates Children

CHICAGO, IL, December 10, 2013 – What kind of world do we want our children to live in? Is it one that celebrates them, raises them up, supports their early learning and development, and shields them from intensive stressors such as violence and poverty?

Because that world is a real possibility when there are so many impactful actions happening in communities across the country even as we speak. These actions include the implementation of home visiting programs, and strategies that prevent child sexual abuse, bullying, and abusive head trauma before they ever occur.

And yet, while we choose to embrace so many things that children need to thrive, early learning, health care, and home environments that are stable and loving, we still accept the existence of cultural norms that have the potential to undermine all of these wonderful advances.

In recent years, we have seen the development of the Baby Shaker App which Apple approved, and then pulled from the market; the release of the Adam Sandler movie That’s My Boy; and now the creation of a “closed” Facebook group called "National Baby Shaking League Real Mommy Blog.”

All of these examples are considered attempts at humor by their creators, and all have been deemed acceptable by their supporters. Some will even argue that to raise a critical discussion of these efforts is to question free-speech.

But we reject these arguments and prefer to ask the public, what kind of world do we want our children to live in?

Because all children are our children, their future are our futures, and a society that embraces these forms of humor and escapism, is a world that is ultimately antithetical to one that supports early learning, stability, love, and healthy environments for which children can develop and thrive in.

Does this mean we should ban these forms of expression? It does not, but we can be clear that as members of a society that wants to raise children-up and not tear them down, these forms of expression are unacceptable to us.

What can you do though?

You can boycott products and groups such as these when they are created. You can publicly express your distaste to the corporations that support their existence. And you can do the opposite of everything they value by lending your time, creativity, and energy to building a society that raises healthy children and supports their families and the communities they live in.

If you’re not sure how to do these things, please let us know, because we would be happy to work with you on behalf of children, all children, our children.

“We choose to embrace a culture that celebrates children and enhances their healthy development,” says James M. Hmurovich, President & CEO, Prevent Child Abuse America. “But we cannot do it alone, so please join us, because together, we have the opportunity to make a difference.”

 

 

 

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Current news

Child Advocates Descend on DC in Defense of Home Visiting and Abuse Prevention

 

Child Advocates Descend on DC in Defense of Home Visiting and Abuse Prevention

Representatives from Prevent Child Abuse America’s 50 state network are in Washington to advocate for two laws that are critical to the healthy development of children and families.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Advocates from every state in the Prevent Child Abuse America 50 state chapter network are in the nation’s capital today, advocating for key pieces of legislation that are proven to improve the lives of children and families nationwide.

Prevent Child Abuse Executive Directors and advocates from around the nation are calling for the reauthorization of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program and for the Child Abuse and Prevention Treatment Act (CAPTA) to be fully funded.

MIECHV supports evidence-based home visiting initiatives that provide the support, experience and knowledge critical to success during pregnancy and through the first few years of a child’s life. Among the programs supported by MIECHV is Healthy Families America (HFA), Prevent Child Abuse America’s signature prevention program, that provides more than 86,000 families annually with services that are proven to increase the knowledge and skill of parents, improve the early learning abilities of children, reduce incidences of child maltreatment, and improve overall family self-sufficiency.

Currently, MIECHV is set to expire at the end of March. If Congress fails to reauthorize MIECHV, tens of thousands of families across the country would lose access to home visiting services like HFA, and thousands of family support workers would find their jobs in jeopardy.

CAPTA is a historic law that dates to 1974 and is one of the major ways that the federal government funds state programs that prevent and reduce child abuse and neglect. In fiscal year 2015, CAPTA state grants were funded at a level of $26 million, a number so low that resulted in some states receiving less than $100,000 to cover the costs associated with child protection, reporting, and investigation of claims.

Calling this level of funding “beyond inadequate,” advocates from Prevent Child Abuse America are requesting that Congress fund CAPTA state grants at a minimum level of $30 million.

“MIECHV and CAPTA are two of the major ways that the federal government help ensure that families and children have access to the programs and services that help them thrive,” said James M. Hmurovich, President and CEO of Prevent Child Abuse America. “These programs desperately need to be reauthorized and fully funded so that we can not only reduce incidences of child abuse and neglect, but move our country closer to the ideal in which no child is ever abused or neglected and every family is equipped to give their children the best lives possible.”

The Head of the River

 

The Head of the River

CHICAGO, IL, February 12, 2015 There's a public health tale about two people walking-up to a river and seeing children floating by. One person says we need to pull these children out of the water, and the other says yes we do, but what we really need to do is go to the head of the river and figure out why they're falling in to begin with.

We were reminded of this tale as we read “Shame on U.S.- Failings by All Three Branches of Our Federal Government Leave Abused and Neglected Children Vulnerable to Further Harm,” the recent report from the Children's Advocacy Institute.

This report is speaking truth to power, and eloquently points out what's wrong with the child welfare system at every level.The report also points to what can be done to improve the situation as we seek to ensure great childhoods and equal opportunities for the healthy development of all children:

  • We can invest in real, evidence-based prevention such as home visiting, and programs like Healthy Families America, to keep kids out of the system on the first place.
  • We can put child well-being front and center on the national policy agenda.
  • We can develop and enforce certain maltreatment standards among all states, and the report calls for some of that, particularly in defining maltreatment.

We can go to the head of the river, but we must also acknowledge, that the report is dangerously silent on primary prevention.

 

You could argue that this is not the intended topic of the report, that the report is intended as a call to action to the public agencies who serve children and families. But prevention is our mission at Prevent Child Abuse America, we want to prevent child abuse and neglect before it ever occurs, and the responsibility for doing so goes well beyond public agencies alone.

 

The report also points out the inconsistencies in accounting for the children known to the child welfare systems; a topic we write about every year when the annual federal report on Child Maltreatment is released. The lack of uniform definitions is important, because it prohibits

 

maltreatment trend analysis even in the same state and does not allow for a true assessment of the issue nationally. It also places the ordinary citizen in a state of confusion because of inconsistent understanding as to whether maltreatment is increasing or decreasing.

 

We advocate for the development of a comprehensive measure of how well public agencies promote child well-being; a definition and accompanying benchmarks that go beyond child protective services that serves kids whose well-being already has been compromised. Public health, education, law enforcement, public welfare and each of us all have a role to play in overall child well-being, not just child protective services.

 

Our 2012 study on the economic impact of child abuse and neglect shows that the U.S. spends $80 billion each year on services focused on everything from mental health to juvenile justice; and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also reports that each victim of child abuse will cost the nation approximately $210,000 over the course of their lifetime. Prevention is the right thing to do and it offers a strong return on the investment

 

It's time we go to the head of the river, and we hope you will join us by:

 

·         Learning more about how we can prevent child abuse and neglect before it ever occurs.

·         Volunteering at local child and family-serving agencies, such as those in our chapter network.

·         Advocating for expanded prevention strategies such as home visiting in the communities and states where you live.  

 

If you don’t know how to take these actions, please let us know, we’ll be happy to help you figure it out.

 

"Improving the  Child Protective Services system, as this report so eloquently describes, is critical and analogous to building new hospitals to fight a disease," said James M. Hmurovich, President & CEO, Prevent Child Abuse America. “We must garner the public and political will to allocate the funds it will cost to reduce the likelihood of a child needing to go to a hospital or into the child protective services system. We have the evidence-based strategies to do that, all we have to do now is demand the resources to bring them to scale.”

 

Our Responsibility to Our Nation

 

Our Responsibility to Our Nation

CHICAGO, IL, Feb 11 - As adults we all have a responsibility to the future of our nation.  The old saying “our children are our future” provides each of us with an opportunity to both serve our nation and to serve the well-being of our nation’s children.  Ensuring their healthy development is something that should be the norm, not the exception.

The recent story about two Maryland children who were walking home, unsupervised has created a firestorm of controversy and opinion. The incident pits the roles, responsibilities and decisions of parents against those of the agencies that, by law, are required to investigate even the suspicion of child maltreatment. To us, what this story shows is that striking the balance between those two things can be difficult, but that ultimately the responsibility must rest somewhere. And we believe that it rests with each of us.

There is no question that parents ultimately have responsibility over the safety and well-being of their child. Engaged parents know their child best; they take the time to understand their child’s emotional, mental, physical and developmental maturity and they are their child’s first and most important teacher. At the same time, we must recognize that not all circumstances, parents, and situations are perfect or even equal.   

There’s also no question that government has a vested interest in the health and well-being of children as well. Child welfare organizations must follow the law of their states as it relates to child abuse and neglect, and these laws typically reflect community standards overall. We are grateful that such dedicated workers like child protective service workers and police officers have committed their lives to the well-being of children and families in general. But families and government are not the only ones responsible for the wellbeing of children.

And this is where the “each of us” part comes in. This incident should be seen as an opportunity to have both parents and government contribute to a shared vision; a vision for the healthy development of all children, regardless of where they live, who they are, or from what cultural-socio-economic group they are a member. Organizations like the Child Welfare League of America are advancing this shared vision through The National Blueprint for Excellence in Child Welfare. The rest of us can help to normalize that.

Those who cite statistics indicating that the rates of children being abducted by strangers are low are correct – about 3% of all abductions, according to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children - just as those who say a child has a greater chance of injury from a trip in the car than a trip to the park are correct. Indeed, we would argue that it should be normal for children to be able to walk home from the park without incident, but it should be just as normal for adults along the way to look out for those children. But both points, while true, miss the larger issue:  our collective responsibility to children.

 

So instead of arguing which law or whose rights take precedent, we should agree that the ultimate goal is to create great childhoods and safe stable environments for all children.  We must have an open and honest conversation as to how best we can together share this responsibility to make our communities places where children and families are supported and normalize the idea that we all play a role in the lives of children. From urban planners who work to put parks within neighborhoods, to home visitors from services like Healthy Families America to public policymakers, corporate business people and religious leaders, we all have a role to play. If we want to strike the best balance between parental parenting and government involvement, then we need to truly balance it: a two legged stool will fall, but three will stand strong. Communities must be that third leg.

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